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In Winner-Take-All Politics, Jacob S. Hacker and Paul Pierson is a Better Way for Africa by Dambisa Moyo; Niall Ferguson (Foreword by). York Times bestselling author Dambisa Moyo offers a bold account of the decline of the West's economic supremacy. She examines how the. The best democracy books recommended by Eric Schmidt, Donald Trump Jr., S.e. Cupp, Jesse Singal and Stephen Hayes. LOS CAMINANTES DISCOGRAFIA TORRENT Thank you Version C. And that Popular remote can I addition to. Notify me of followup comments via. This is : the. Web Browser by Splashtop.

In general Moyo's book is a very challenging book, and addresses our problems. It confronts those aid gurus, like Prof. Jeffrey Sachs, who manipulate the African leaders with their neo-liberal agendas. It is a very good starting point for further discussion, and can contribute to eliminating confusing ideas. Dambisa Moyo is an international economist who writes on the macroeconomy and global affairs.

Her work regularly appears in economic and finance-related publications such as the Financial Times and the Wall Street Journal. Customer Reviews, including Product Star Ratings help customers to learn more about the product and decide whether it is the right product for them. Instead, our system considers things like how recent a review is and if the reviewer bought the item on Amazon. It also analyzed reviews to verify trustworthiness. Enhance your purchase.

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Page 1 of 1 Start over Page 1 of 1. Abhijit V. William Easterly. Daron Acemoglu. Paul Collier. Jeffrey Sachs. Dambisa Moyo. Born and raised in Lusaka, Zambia, Moyo completed a Ph. Kennedy School of Government. She worked for the World Bank as a consultant, and also worked at Goldman Sachs for eight years.

All rights reserved. We live in a culture in which those who are better o. In the past decade alone, on the back of Live 8, Make Poverty History, the Millennium Development Goals, the Millennium Challenge Account, the Africa Commission, and the G7 meeting to name a few , millions of dollars each year have been raised in richer countries to support charities working for Africa.

We are made to believe that this is what we ought to be doing. We are accosted on the streets and goaded with pleas on aeroplane journeys; letters flow through our mail boxes and countless television appeals remind us that we have a moral imperative to give more to those who have less. At the Labour conference, the UK's Prime Minister of the time, Tony Blair, remarked that 'The State of Africa is a scar on the conscience of the world', and that the West should 'provide more aid' as, thus far, amidst the multiple problems facing Africa, the continent had received inadequate amounts of aid.

The pop culture of aid has bolstered these misconceptions. Aid has become part of the entertainment industry. Media figures, film stars, rock legends eagerly embrace aid, proselytize the need for it, upbraid us for not giving enough, scold governments for not doing enough - and governments respond in kind, fearful of losing popularity and desperate to win favour. Bono attends world summits on aid. Bob Geld of is, to use Tony Blair's own words, 'one of the people that I admire most'.

Aid has become a cultural commodity. Millions march for it. Governments are judged by it. In fact, across the globe the recipients of this aid are worse o. Yet aid remains a centrepiece of today's development policy and one of the biggest ideas of our time.

The notion that aid can alleviate systemic poverty, and has done so, is a myth. Millions in Africa are poorer today because of aid; misery and poverty have not ended but have increased. Aid has been, and continues to be, an unmitigated political, economic, and humanitarian disaster for most parts of the developing world. How this happened, how the world was gripped with an idea that seemed so right but was in fact so wrong, is what this book is about.

Dead Aid is the story of the failure of post-war development policy. Step by step it will dismantle the assumptions and arguments that have supported the single worst decision of modern developmental. The evidence is as startling as it is obvious.

It will contrast countries which have rejected the aid route and prospered with others which have become dependent on aid and been trapped in a vicious circle of corruption, market distortion and further poverty - and thus the 'need' for more aid. Others before me have criticized aid. But the myth of its effectiveness persists. Dead Aid will offer a new model for financing development for the world's poorest countries: one that offers economic growth, promises to significantly reduce African poverty, and most importantly does not rely on aid.

This book is not a counsel of despair. Far from it. The book offers another road; a road less travelled in Africa. Harder, more demanding, more difficult, but in the end the road to growth, prosperity, and independence for the continent. This book is about the aid-free solution to development: why it is right, why it has worked, why it is the only way forward for the world's poorest countries.

This work is protected under copyright laws and reproduction is strictly prohibited. Permission to reproduce the material in any manner or medium must be secured from the Publisher. Excerpted by permission. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher. Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc.

Read more. Start reading Dead Aid on your Kindle in under a minute. Don't have a Kindle? Learn skills from picture taking to sushi making. Amazon Explore Browse now. About the author Follow authors to get new release updates, plus improved recommendations. Brief content visible, double tap to read full content. Full content visible, double tap to read brief content. Read more Read less. Customer reviews. How customer reviews and ratings work Customer Reviews, including Product Star Ratings help customers to learn more about the product and decide whether it is the right product for them.

Learn more how customers reviews work on Amazon. Top reviews Most recent Top reviews. Top reviews from the United States. There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later. Verified Purchase. This is a must-read. Granted, Moyo is doubtless receiving more press simply because she is a black African female giving a fairly conservative opinion of aid. Others have been saying this same thing for a long time, but it's often disregarded as an excuse for saving money or keeping help from the poor.

I live and work in Haiti, and this is completely as applicable to this country as it is to Africa, although the Chinese influence doesn't apply here. I recommend this for all aid workers, and really anyone connected with emerging or not economies. Aid is a bad thing! Of course, Moyo doesn't go quite that far, but I certainly do. She bases her findings on well documented data, and arranges it in quite an easy-to-read volume.

I'm looking forward to more works by her. We all know the definition of insanity- doing the same thing the same way while expecting different results. This book explains how this insanity is hurting Africa. My Step daughter and her boyfriend have done charity work in Africa. I'm planning on sending them this book as it is a great outline of the problems created with Foreign Aid and very succinctly explains the evidence and reasons of why it doesn't work.

I first heard this author interviewed on Dennis Prager's program and was inspired to buy the book as the charming author is such an obviously wise and well educated African woman. Explores Chinese Development Aid in Africa Provides a comparative case study of European and Chinese approaches to development aid Opens a discussion on the distinctive nature of Chinese foreign policy.

Buying options eBook EUR Softcover Book EUR Hardcover Book EUR Learn about institutional subscriptions. Table of contents 9 chapters Search within book Search. Front Matter Pages i-xvii. Conclusion Zeqi Qiu Pages Back Matter Pages Back to top. It provides insights into how recipient countries and regions are selected, and describes in detail how the men and women working in the frontlines deliver aid.

Information from past research, participant observations, interviews and other fieldwork are brought together to form a comprehensive picture of how Chinese development aid for health to Uganda has evolved over three decades, how it is carried out now, and the significance of such milestones as the building of the China-Uganda Friendship Hospital.

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Winner take all dambisa moyo ebook torrents shu mod utorrent games

A national bestseller, Dead Aid unflinchingly confronts one of the greatest myths of our time: that billions of dollars in aid sent from wealthy countries to developing African nations has helped to reduce poverty and increase growth.

Aller vers linconnu torrent Page 1 of 1 Start over Page 1 of 1. To see our price, add these items to your cart. I first heard this author interviewed on Dennis Prager's program and was inspired to buy the book as the charming author is such an obviously wise and well educated African woman. Well written book that should be compulsory reading for all the woke luvvies who assuage their guilt and reveal their ignorance by giving endless amounts of aid to Africa in the hope that it is doing good; it actually does the opposite. With the first barrel, Moyo demolishes all the most cherished myths about aid being a good thing. Alexa Actionable Analytics for the Web. Dead Aid calls for a new way of thinking.
Winner take all dambisa moyo ebook torrents Back Matter Pages Brief content visible, double tap to read full content. Learn about institutional subscriptions. She worked for the World Bank as a consultant, and also here at Goldman Sachs for eight years. Later in the book she points out how China has become very active in Africa. I live and work in Haiti, and this is completely as applicable to this country as it is to Africa, although the Chinese influence doesn't apply here. Dambisa Moyo.
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To be sure, China is not the first country to launch a global crusade to secure resources. From Britain's transcontinental operations dating back to the end of the 16th century, to the rise of modern European and American transnational corporations between the mid 's and 's, the industrial revolution that powered these economies created a voracious demand for raw materials and created the need to go far beyond their native countries.

So too is China's resource rush today. Although still in its early stages, already the breadth of China's operation is awesome, and seemingly unstoppable. China's global charge for commodities is a story of China's quest to secure its claims on resource assets, and to guarantee the flow of inputs needed to continue to drive economic development. Moyo, an expert in global commodities markets, explains the implications of China's resource grab in a world of diminishing resources.

Previous page. Print length. Publication date. September 10, Reading age. See all details. Next page. Frequently bought together. Total price:. To see our price, add these items to your cart. Some of these items ship sooner than the others. Show details Hide details. Choose items to buy together. Only 13 left in stock more on the way. In Stock. Only 1 left in stock - order soon. Customers who viewed this item also viewed. Page 1 of 1 Start over Page 1 of 1. Dambisa Moyo. Winner Takes All would delight Gradgrind: it is peppered with nuggets and statistics, both macro and micro.

One cannot accuse Moyo of failing to do her homework. So much has been packed into it that her book is impossible to read without learning something If you want to know why certain things will happen then read this book today. Thoroughly researched and alarmingly convincing, Winner Take All should serve as a warning of what might be in store down the road.

Rather, she aims in part to frighten; in its quest to satisfy the rising demands of 1. From Africa to Central Asia to Latin America, China exerts growing influence over prices for the commodities we all must buy to fuel our cars, heat our homes, and power our economies. To western eyes, Winner Take All makes for scary reading.

The sheer scale of its purchases is astonishing. You must read this book if you want to understand the reality of what's happening in the world today. I am afraid the West is going to wake up too late to prepare for the future. By focusing her razor-sharp mind on China's central role in the new commodities rush, Moyo sheds light on and makes sense of a profound and dramatic moment in our history. Her book is a must-read. Dambisa Moyo is a prize-winning economist.

She lives in New York City. Start reading Winner Take All on your Kindle in under a minute. Don't have a Kindle? Discover live virtual experiences for the family. Amazon Explore Browse now. About the author Follow authors to get new release updates, plus improved recommendations. Brief content visible, double tap to read full content. Full content visible, double tap to read brief content.

Read more Read less. Customer reviews. How customer reviews and ratings work Customer Reviews, including Product Star Ratings help customers to learn more about the product and decide whether it is the right product for them. Learn more how customers reviews work on Amazon. Top reviews Most recent Top reviews. Top reviews from the United States. There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later. Verified Purchase. Joe Chernicoff writes: My interest in China began about 3 decades ago after spending a brief time in that country, and as many people, I found China's continuing economic growth of great interest, Robert D.

Kaplan's book "Monsoon" provided more interest creating data with his discussion of the South China Sea, China's role in India, and related information. My interest was also peaked since I have an undergraduate degree in agriculture, and some grad work in agricultural economics, but even for those who have no knowledge of the commodity markets, this book is valuable.

It provides a good lesson on how China has been able to take control of much of the world market's supply of valuable commodities, how what China does in Africa and Latin America can be a lesson form the United States and the rest of the Western world. Her chapters on harbingers of things to come and what constitutes a clear and present danger are quite interesting, and worthwhile reading.

All in all, I recommend this work for everyone to read - it will serve you well. This book describes how China is gaining present and future access to the world's commodities. I came away valuing what I learned, but feeling the content was more appropriate for an article in The Economist. At times I felt the author was trying to expand in order to fill a book, e.

This is a work of geopolitical economics, but it is fascinating and the author Ms Moyo has done an excellent job of identiying the salient points of the situation in as lean a format as you could ask for. In addition I read the book for its financial investment value, which, while not its main purpose, provided useful information peering into the mist of the future giving as clear a picture of intent as you can get. This is an excellent read.

One person found this helpful. Such a good book. The author has a unique insight into economics in Africa, especially subSaharan Africa. Informative and interesting. If we think thet China is just trying to get easy money exploiting their citizens, we could be underestimating it. The steps China is taking, apparently perfectly planned, could scare you. This book helps a lot to understand what they are doing to be strong in the long run. Highly recomended. After Dead Aid, Dambisa Moyo does not choose to rest on her laurels.

Her campaign aiming at providing a better grasp of Africa's prospects in a global world continues in a more relevant and meticulous fashion. Her new book, Winner Take All: China's Race for Resources and What it Means for the World, is a blatant proof showing that the international success of Dead Aid was not a result of random happenstance. Dambisa Moyo is deep, her new book is very insightful; however, I argue that her thought should not got unchallenged.

In Dead Aid, Moyo is blunt. She argues that the cause of Africa's precarious conditions is aid, mainly concessional non-emergency loans and grants. But, Africa has not been better off. Hence, aid, according to Moyo, is the cause of poverty in Africa. To me, this is a pretty bold statement, and I am afraid that it does suffer from a type of logical fallacy known as "the post hoc fallacy," one that confuses correlation with causation.

But notwithstanding this logical shortcoming, the existing positive correlation between aid and poverty i. Why on earth over the past thirty years, the most aid-dependent countries, according to Moyo, have enjoyed growth rates averaging minus 0. Between and , when aid flows to Africa were at their peak, poverty increased from about 12 percent to a shocking 66 percent.

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Winner take all dambisa moyo ebook torrents vw new beetle service manual 98-10 torrent

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She fails to provide the essential domestic component in China's resources demand. For instance, the book takes China's increasing demand for food and land on which to grow it as an external issue whereas it stems in considerable part from the inadequacies of the country's domestic agriculture and the policy priorities of successive governments. Equally, there is no discussion of how the large excess capacity of Chinese industry fuels purchases of hard commodities beyond what the country really needs.

As with manufactured goods, China has to "go out" in part because of the weaknesses of domestic policies. It has built up big inventory stockpiles which enable it to act as the market price fixer and produce a whole subset of traders whose purchases may well be sold on world markets rather than ever going to the mainland. Such factors need to be considered for a fuller assessment of the role of a country in which the authorities often pursue self-defeating policies that have global implications.

Nor does Moyo's depiction of China as the winner which will take all in the competition for global resources take sufficient account of the problems, some self-inflicted, which companies from the mainland are experiencing. Moyo's book is published just as the global "super cycle" in hard commodities appears to be tapering off, in part because of the decline in China's growth rate. An upward cycle in agricultural products may set in if China has a bad harvest and the government relaxes its grain self-sufficiency policy.

But, for all Moyo's insistence that a crisis is inevitable and that China will be the only gainer, we are in uncertain territory here. Forecasting commodity movement is notoriously difficult given the number of factors involved in determining supply and demand. Moyo has rung an alarm bell, but how her warnings will translate into reality remains problematic — as does China's ability to be the winner which takes all. A study of China's impact on the world economy neglects the country's domestic failings.

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Want to Read saving…. Want to Read Currently Reading Read. Other editions. Enlarge cover. Error rating book. Refresh and try again. Open Preview See a Problem? Details if other :. Thanks for telling us about the problem. Return to Book Page. Commodities permeate virtually every aspect of modern daily living, but for all their importance--their breadth, their depth, their intricacies, and their central role in daily life--few people who are not economists or traders know how commodity markets work.

Almost every day, newspaper headlines and media commentators scream warnings of impending doom--shortages of arabl Commodities permeate virtually every aspect of modern daily living, but for all their importance--their breadth, their depth, their intricacies, and their central role in daily life--few people who are not economists or traders know how commodity markets work. Almost every day, newspaper headlines and media commentators scream warnings of impending doom--shortages of arable land, clashes over water, and political conflict as global demand for fossil fuels outstrips supply.

The picture is bleak, but our grasp of the details and the macro shifts in commodities markets remain blurry. Winner Take All is about the commodity dynamics that the world will face over the next several decades. In particular, it is about the implications of China's rush for resources across all regions of the world.

The scale of China's resource campaign for hard commodities metals and minerals and soft commodities timber and food is among the largest in history. To be sure, China is not the first country to launch a global crusade to secure resources. From Britain's transcontinental operations dating back to the end of the 16th century, to the rise of modern European and American transnational corporations between the mid 's and 's, the industrial revolution that powered these economies created a voracious demand for raw materials and created the need to go far beyond their native countries.

So too is China's resource rush today. Although still in its early stages, already the breadth of China's operation is awesome, and seemingly unstoppable. China's global charge for commodities is a story of China's quest to secure its claims on resource assets, and to guarantee the flow of inputs needed to continue to drive economic development. Moyo, an expert in global commodities markets, explains the implications of China's resource grab in a world of diminishing resources.

Get A Copy. Hardcover , pages. More Details Other Editions All Editions. Friend Reviews. To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up. To ask other readers questions about Winner Take All , please sign up. Lists with This Book. Community Reviews. Showing Average rating 3. Rating details. More filters. Sort order. Nov 19, Brit Cheung rated it really liked it Shelves: perspectives-on-china. I misjudged the book at first.

I thought it's a book criticizing China's mass investment in Africa and thought the author would reproach China's national behavior as a new economy colonialism,the orthodox stereotype. Let us put the epigram from Roosevelt here first as the keynote: If we shrink from a hard contest where men must win at hazard of their lives and at risk of the people they hold dear, then the stronger and bolder peoples will pass us by and win for themsel I misjudged the book at first.

Let us put the epigram from Roosevelt here first as the keynote: If we shrink from a hard contest where men must win at hazard of their lives and at risk of the people they hold dear, then the stronger and bolder peoples will pass us by and win for themselves the dominance of the world. Sounds overwhelming Will do the review asap: 1. Reserving judgments is a matter of infinite hope First impression of a book doesn't always count and it may lead you to miscalculations.

I "thought" this book would be tinged with a perspective of criticizing China's energy policy. Actually it is rather impartial compared to a great deal of other articles. Misunderstandings come from inappropriate preconceptions, so keeping mind wide open and reserving judgments could be not only a virtue but a necessity, or else we would plunge into blunders. Was China's massive demand for resources auspicious or ominous for the world?

It is complicated to define but my answer is the positive one. I don't understand the hypothesis that people should deprecate China's global procurement and deem the trades between nations kind of pillage and plunder. Trades between nations can only be conducted out of willingness and based on their own national interests. China is the first or second largest trading partners of not a few countries and it maintains relatively positive images in international trading conducts.

If the supply and demand pattern is not congruous with each other's interests, the trades could not be likely because you can always find an alternative in this global trading system. Let us ponder a very simple assumption: Is China's economic slowdown good for the global economy? When China is ushering into its economic new normal and cutting down its imports of mass products and resources and raw materials, a lot of countries can feel the pain. LET us be more realistic and face the harsh truth, no country could be exempt from the current global economic feebleness and could keep itself intact.

Forewarned is forearmed "China seems to be the only country that is preparing for this eventuality in a sustainable way. But this leaves the important question of what happens when ostensibly has access to available resources and the rest of the world doesn't?

Every country should consider its future but this worry should not be overstated. The technology innovation is an option and the cooperation of all nations is another. The Community of Sharing Destiny for mankind espoused by China is seemingly a mere ideal in papers? I guess the government is seriously brooding over this for a long time. But it can only be advanced and achieved by the collaborations of the entire international community.

If you think the Chinese government advances this advocacy out of nowhere and it won't take it seriously, you just don't understand the Chinese government. They may have done something unfavorable to its people,like the stringent censorship, but it always keeps its words.

Once it promises something for the whole world, it will get it done regardless of the plights. And perhaps this is a facet of the Chinese government you don't know before. View 1 comment. Jun 05, Book rated it really liked it Shelves: politics-economics. The book's spotlight is on China's central role in the commodities dynamics. Best-selling author, international economist and a native of Zambia, Dr.

Moyo has written a professional yet accessible book that tackles the following broad themes: economic implications of China's Winner Take All: China's Race for Resources and What It Means for the World by Dambisa Moyo "Winner Take All" is an even-handed assessment on China's race for resources and the implications this has for the rest of the world.

Moyo has written a professional yet accessible book that tackles the following broad themes: economic implications of China's ascendency, China's growing financial reach and its implications for the workings of the global commodity markets, and the social and political implications of China's quest for resources.

In general, the author succeeds in addressing the main themes through substance rather than with style and flair. Positives: 1. Well-researched and well-written book that is accessible for the masses. An even-handed book. The author seems very fair and logical. Her arguments and assessments are backed by sound economic perspectives. She's not afraid to be critical while remaining objective.

Moyo has the right background and great credentials to write such books. I'm also happy to see a female voice who is a native of Zambia in an otherwise male-dominated arena providing some refreshing and thought-provoking insights. The author lays out early on what this book is all about and proceeds to methodically support her arguments with sound economic logic and knowledge. I like how the author considers various points of view of an issue.

Effective use of charts, stats and facts that add value to the narrative of the book. Does a wonderful job of establishing China's economic agenda. Enlightening look at the global commodity complex. The demand pressures on: arable land, water, energy, and minerals.

Excellent snapshot of the world's resource supply. China's effective three-pronged approach into international resource markets. How China does it. Excellent narrative on this. Amazing facts and thought-provoking statements. China's and the world's biggest challenges. The inner working of the global commodity markets. Perhaps the most complicated aspect of this book but the author keeps it manageable.

The perceived threats of China's growing role to the rest of the world. China's commodity campaign. Excellent points. Three unique characteristics of credit-market crises and the two incontrovertible instances when government intervention is warranted. China's strategy in practice and how the hosts perceive it. Is it beneficial? Global food insecurity, it comes down to: food waste, misallocation of food, and policies that disincentives food production.

One of the strongest points of the book. Shale and its prospects for transforming the energy sector. Also an interesting look at nuclear energy. A look at pollution. The clash and potential for violence over resources. Demand-supply imbalances. You can only come up with good answers if you ask the right questions A global effort to address the questions.

Does a real good job of summarizing her main point. Links to notes worked great and bibliography provided Negatives: 1. The book tends to be repetitive. She hammers certain points and comes back to them frequently. One thing is clear you will absorb what China's main goals are and that is a goal of the book. The book lacks panache. The writing style is a bit stiff and lacks flair.

It's not very engaging even though I do feel it was effective. Some acronyms were not properly defined. It doesn't say much about Chinese culture it's all about the economics and implications. A few times the book wasn't consistent at one point it describes as million Chinese as living in poverty while in another occasion it was a billion.

I'm an engineer, I'm sorry I notice these things. I'm always a little leery of referencing the Heritage Foundation the same outfit that denies climate change while the author clearly accepts it. That being said it appears the database referenced is useful. In summary, this is a very effective and even-handed book. The author takes her emotions out of it and proceeds to support her arguments with sound logic and economics.

My only main gripe with the book has to do with the stiff, as-a-matter-of-fact style. A little more engaging style would have made the book more enjoyable for readers. Be that as it may, I have a much better understanding of China's growing role in the global economy and for that I thank Dr. If you are interested in global economics and the race for scarce resources, this is the book to read!

Aug 14, Max rated it really liked it. Good book! Personally, I have loathed the European centrism towards Africa and the seemingly unbreakable aid-cycle and victimization. She shows that China approaches African countries as trading partners, providing cash and infrastructure projects in exchange for their commodities. Not as helpless victims that need pity. I'm so happy to see Africans like DM have also opened their eyes.

However, this was not DM's m Good book! However, this was not DM's main argument. She claims that China is the only country in the world taking the apparent upcoming commodities shortage serious. They are the only ones that have a long term strategy to secure inflow of basic commodities, such as copper, wheat, ore, oil, etc. Western countries are not aware of the urgency and will be left in the cold when disaster strikes, somewhere in the near future.

Disaster is described as an immediate shortage of commodities and a dramatic price increase. I buy this argument partly. Yes, a commodity shortage will occur in the coming 15 years, and yes, China should be very concerned as they lack the ability to feed themselves. But we will not feel the pain as badly as DM describes. Otherwise too-costly production methods will suddenly become economically viable and the high prices will open opportunities for alternatives.

You can see this happening with the oil market already, other commodities will undergo similar trends. Despite my reservations about the bleak outlook, I do support the point that the Chinese government is a showcase of sound decision-making. No internal squabbling, but focus on future of the people. Europe should take their example. Aug 17, David Bruns rated it really liked it. I saw the author interviewed on Bill Maher and decided to pick up the book before my next trip to China. I'm glad I did.

It helped to put snippets of news stories about China and expansionist plans in developing countries into real context. China has a plan - it's a long-range, comprehensive, global reaching quest for raw materials that will fuel the engine of their economy for decades to come. Theirs is not a mission to improve the global standard of living, but if a country needs a new port to I saw the author interviewed on Bill Maher and decided to pick up the book before my next trip to China.

Theirs is not a mission to improve the global standard of living, but if a country needs a new port to enable them ship oil to China they know how to get it done without the constipation of congressional action that we live with in a democracy. If Why Nations Fail: The Origins of Power, Prosperity, and Poverty tells you how "extractive" economic and political institutions like those in China will ultimately fail, Moyo gives you a convincing reason why their progress pre-failure might be more than we can handle.

Apr 22, Andrew rated it liked it. One-Minute Review Big bad China? Moyo, a PhD Oxon, economic writer, and former World Bank employee is uniquely positioned to criticize Western aid programmes. She deploys reputable and convincing facts to make her arguments, pointing out the benefits China offers to the populous demographic south.

Winner Take All is a primer for a key topic of this century and important for anyone wanting to understand the intersection between politics and resources. Aug 15, Liz Murray rated it really liked it. This is probably the first economics book I've read, but it goes far beyond simple economics. While in South Africa a couple of people I met mentioned the Chinese influence and they didn't speak highly of it however after reading this book I see it in greater perspective.

China is helping build infrastructure in many parts of Africa, including hospitals, schools and roads. There will always be reservation This is probably the first economics book I've read, but it goes far beyond simple economics.

There will always be reservations and Moyo is far from a China cheerleader but gives credit where credit is due. She grew up in Zambia so is not speaking as an outsider but as someone who intimately knows the pros and cons of foreign investment in Africa.

I did skip some parts of the book but overall I found it a clearly written book aimed at the general populace and not economic experts. It's a book I'll hold onto as a reference book. To understand what changes the world faces this is almost essential reading. The introductory first 4 chapters and the final chapter are really interesting as Moyo presents an array of facts to support the premise of the book. In between though, is a lot of trollop. For example, Moyo suggests that the western views on China are biased, so chases it with almost 15 pages of pro-China bia The introductory first 4 chapters and the final chapter are really interesting as Moyo presents an array of facts to support the premise of the book.

For example, Moyo suggests that the western views on China are biased, so chases it with almost 15 pages of pro-China bias, providing no balance and just appearing hypocritical. Oct 25, AJ Payne rated it liked it Shelves: non-fiction , asia , china , development , economics. I really wanted to like this a lot more than I actually did. Interesting, but I found it a bit…bland. The guy who read it sounded so robotic I had a really Audiobook.

The guy who read it sounded so robotic I had a really hard time paying attention to him, which made it harder to like the book. Too bad. Jul 29, Sookie rated it liked it Shelves: non-fiction. Moyo provides a nuanced look at the world of commodity by comparing China, her study for the subject matter, with BRICS, USA and other countries that have naturally occurring mineral resources. Though not absolute, this book acts a foundation and opens up lot of conversations involving pollution, over consumption of natural resources etc.

Mar 06, Oliver rated it it was amazing. This was the second book I've read by Moyo, the first was Dead Aid and htis left me equally as impressed. She tackles another deeply interesting and relevant topic- China's entrepreneurial efforts in the world and what implications it will have.

I really thought her discussion of monopsony was really interesting, not only for the word itself, but for the concept. Could it really be possible that China is a singular buyer for key resources? Wouldn't market forces impede that? Unless China was able This was the second book I've read by Moyo, the first was Dead Aid and htis left me equally as impressed.

Unless China was able to pay prices above the market value which other countries were not able to match. I think this has the deppest consequences for fellow developing countries who need key resources like gold, oil, copper and others, especially in Africa. I disagree somewhat with her assessment that China has been welcomed with open arms in Africa.

When I was in Malawi, as well as South Sudan, Tanzania and Kenya, I felt that the general populous had a bitterly negative reaction to the Chinese presence, as they were taking jobs and local economy away from Africans. This may not reflect the face and agreement that the government's perspective on Chinese ODI, but it reflects the ants eye view, at least at a micro level. Delving deep into the economic principles behind carry cotango and backwardation , volatility, and correlation in the commodities market was also supremely interesting, and something I'd never heard of before.

The argument that Moyo makes that China is taking steps to make itself more sustainable by stockpiling and buying resources to facilitate future development is an interesting one. Still, I would strike back that stockpiling and sustainability are not analogous. Moyo makes the repeated point that resources are finite and populations growing, and this will inevitably lead to shortages, and China seems to be the only state trying to buffer themselves, outside of states with sovereign wealth funds.

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Will America's System Win The Global Ideological Battle? with Dambisa Moyo

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