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UAD plug-ins give authentic analog sound to your in-the-box mixes. Create with exclusive titles from Neve,® API,® SSL,® Studer,® and more. Learn more. A studio I tech at has six of his modules and six original UA s. The engineer says they sound different, but we have yet to do a technical comparison.

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LUNA wurde für die nahtlose Integration mit Apollo Audio Interfaces entwickelt LUNA Instruments bringt die Expertise von UA in den Bereichen Modeling. Overview The Universal Audio Solo/ is a standalone mic pre-amp with handle, The UA imparts a big sound to vocals and acoustic guitar, making it a. Give your tracks startling three-dimensional tube warmth, presence, and body with the UA Tube Preamp. Learn more. IPFILTER UTORRENT 3-2-1 Domino The classic game free Zoom new orgs. Line interface dispute, or if you a database agreeing to. Pro Mod are officially parts of. A different be used I like will offer.

VHorns Trumpet. GD-6 Acoustic Guitar. Telematic V3. C7 Grand. Ircam Prepared Piano. Petit Piano. B-5 Organ V3. VTines MK1. Clavi D9. Super II. Urban Drums. The Upright. AS Piano Collection. AS Drums Collection. AS Bass Collection. AS Free Collection. AS Guitar Collection. VTines Live. Show All Products. Your shopping cart is empty! Here are a few pictures of the model we sampled. Authentic reed sound.

We recorded the Wurlie from both the direct output using a state of the art DI Universal Audio Solo and also using a pair of microphones right above the keys next to where the head of a player would be. With our precise resonance model, our detailed staccato and release adjustments and the meticulous velocity layer transitions, the Wurlie is truly the most detailed and accurate recreation of the famous reeds electric piano sound.

In the default panel, you have access to many features including the mix of the Acoustic and Electric volumes. Adjustable vibrato. Real resonances. All the FX you need. That's pretty much everything you need to mimic the sound of any Wurlie in any song. You can turn on or off the amp simulation, based on a the real amp of the Wurlitzer at three different distances , we also added a few other amp simulations like a Mesa Boogie, a fender , and a Gibson.

You also have the choice to load them in stereo or in mono. Advanced settings and MIDI controls. In this panel, you can change some parameters more in depth as well as control the response of the library to your keyboard:. We provide it for free with every library that you buy, you don't need to buy an expensive sampler to use our products.

It works on Mac You can find more info about it here. Advanced UVI scripting giving you access to a simple yet powerful interface and advanced features. If you decide to use an iLok dongle, both V1 and V2 are compatible with our products. You can activate your license on up to 3 computers or iLok dongles at the same time and you can deactivate one and activate another as many times as you want.

FYI, UA recommends powering up the Solo about minutes before operation so that the tubes and transformers are at proper operating temperature. This unit is well-built and has been an extremely reliable performer. This is my go to pre for anything harsh that needs to be softened.

I find that this preamp handles shrill signals in a very pleasing way,making them much more usuable and not as ear piercing. It is useful on thin sounding vocals and harsh guitars. It does work well as an outside or sub kick preamp. The Solo is notable for its abundance of features compared to other preamps.

In addition to Direct Inject input, you also have selectable impedance, and a two stage gain section for tonal control, as well as the usual pad, phase invert controls. I used the Solo on a lot of sources with good luck, notably bass, acoustic guitar, and electric guitar.

I preferred the Solo for vocals most of the time with condenser microphones, but I did like the with dynamic vocal mics such as the Shure SM7B. This preamp seems tailor made for bass guitar, whether DI or miked up, it's warm and fat. I also like the way it softens an acoustic guitar track. You can get some really classy vintage sounds out of this box, and in my world, that's a delight. The variable impedance was very useful to me for tuning the tone of dynamic microphones, many of which seemed to love the "low Z" setting.

I tried different tubes and found them to provide subtle shadings of difference, and ended up with a JAN GE in the first position for a slightly cleaner tone, although the stock JJ 12AX7 sounded excellent. The Darth Vader appearance of the unit is something to love, and it seems built to last. I only occasionally ran into headroom issues, usually when trying vocals.

I like listening back to my recordings made with this preamp, the sounds are warm and inviting. A perfect preamp for those looking to upgrade or expand from a basic setup, or for those getting started looking for a useful single channel.

The Solo is a perfect partner, if you can find one. I think the trick to get this thing not to clip on highly dynamic sources is to crank the first gain knob, and not the second level knob. Try to get as much gain as you can from the first knob, when and if you encounter clipping.

This discontinued preamp and DI unit from Univeral Audio was the solid-state brother-sister to the Solo , a tube unit. Like the Solo this one also has a Direct Inject input, a variable input impedance, and a two stage gain section for tonal shaping. The Solo is modeled on the "vintage" setting of the larger and discontinued too rack preamp units that also had a clean mode and a soft limited mode. The sound is clear and bright but not harsh, and with a sort of friendly analog warmth that's variable based on how much gain you dial in on the first control, that I found especially flattering to electric guitar, acoustic guitar and vocals, although, I would expect this preamp to be very suitable to any number of sources had I seen the opportunity to expand its use.

I would attribute this sound quality to the design, but also to the use of a transformer on the input, which has been a hallmark trait of many of the beloved classic preamp circuits of the past. I find transformer balanced preamps to be more musical for most sources, for my aesthetic. I liked the softly shaded clarity this brought to my productions. Between this, the thicker sounding , and a four channel utility preamp Sytek I felt like I could get anything done and produced a lot of really excellent recordings with a pleasing sound stage.

These were my first high-end preamp channels and open my eyes to the possibilities of recording with world-class equipment. They were miles above any all-in-one preamp-converter-interface box I had ever used and set a benchmark for the quality I have come to demand. The low-Z setting really brought to life a lot of dynamic microphones, and I used it often.

The DI sounded really nice on electric guitar, but I would use the more often for bass guitar. I felt that the Solo series offered a great value, and performed excellently in my DAW based setup, providing a classic sound. I appreciated the single channel form factor as it allowed me to purchase one channel at a time on a realistic budget.

The Solo is well built and seems equipped for any recording task, so I would recommend one highly should you encounter this specimen on the used market. These are interesting preamps. They kind of flew under the radar of the "tube" series, and made one think they might lose out if they didn't get the tube version.

But using this I accidentally got my favorite take I ever tracked. I was recording a band live, with vocals to be dubbed later. I just wanted to make sure everyone could hear the guy. He was sitting away from the band, looking towards them mic aimed away from the band. I hit record and they played through the track pretty darn good. On playback the drums just came to life like harmonic explosions, with a giant room sound.

My compressor works But as I started mixing I could notice a certain indescribable quality to that one Track. It made me want to listen to it, and get lost in it. Undoubtedly it was the preamp, the solo There were lots of other factors, but what I liked the most was the transient "shsh" kinda sound, sort of distorted, yet not noticbly so.

The band loved it and they decided not to do overdubs. The unit feels like a tank, the controls feel like something a pro would design You can tell its not a bunch of cheap parts. And I'd say skip the tube and get the , if you can find one. Great Pre! I used it on every Bass track on my last album. It really does create a big and warm tone. I also used this on the Kik in my drum tracking.

I must say it didnt give me quite the bite i wanted. Warm and Big. This is really an amazing deal for that great tube sound. It's built like a tank and feels like it looks. The only reason i would give it a 9, in sound and in features, rather than a 10 is that some of the controls are in the back which makes it difficult to switch around, and with the Warm Big tone, it sometimes creates unwanted mudd in a mix.

But for the money, i'd recommend this to anyone looking for a tube pre. Needless to say - when I started the mission of building a home studio - I knew I was tackling getting into the digital world, and building my proficiency with PT. Through all that though - I knew that the main course I wanted to plot in building the studio was to have as much analog character as possible with pre's and mikes to try to set the "warmth bar" as high as possible in my recordings.

Enter stage left - the UA A great engineer and touring friend of mine told me "if your goal is to start with a warm, tube-pre, you need to get the And if you ever decide to play out, you've got a really cool looking D. After doing a bunch of recording and testing, testing and recording over the last year to get things where I want them - the has stood out every time as a KILLER source for vocals, acoustic guitar, mandolin - just about anything I can throw at it with the right mic.

I was so impressed with it in the first three months, I went out and bought a second one. And I'm really glad I did. Recently bought a about a month ago, and am about to start a new album session with some friends. This round I'm going focus on just using the s for vocals, to try and make them stick out a little farther in the mix.

No complaints - and in my opinion, a must own for any studio. It's really good for everything else also but these 2 instruments are where the shines. Condensers usually work better on high impedance but this is a box that rarely doesn't sound great mediocre is an unknown word. I propose that because i already made the comparison. The 12at7 does not saturate as easily as the a, but the latter has a fuller and more clear sound at conservative settings which are enough for everything.

The talk about ua distorting the sound is not understood to me. Never occured to me. If i want to distort the box, i'll have to crank it on purpose. Another cool move you can make is change the input tube with a better one. I put a Telefunken instead of a JJ which was a bit harsh on the midrange.

The sound is more analytical now with more depth extended response and the same smooth sound. So grab one if you want the classic vintage sound and you 'll get a fine tube di also. Highly recommended. Sound Quality This pre sounds like pres that cost 3 times as much.

It has that analog tube warmth you expect from a high end pre. I use it primarily on bass, synth, vocals, and guitar. For bass it has nice creamy low end. Very rich sound. The male vocalist in my band has a very high voice and we've always had trouble trying to get his voice to sit in the mix. This baby does the trick, absolutely perfect. On guitar it is awesome. Really gives it a nice, warm, vintage tone. Features The only thing it doesn't have that I wish it did is a nice VU meter.

Other than that it is loaded with features. Giant gain and level knobs, direct in, phantom power, hi-z lo-z switch Overall I have used plenty of preamps, and I find that nothing in this price range compares. For me, I need something to give my material a nice, vintage tone. The tube warmth and tone this adds to audio is unreal. I did quite a bit of research before picking one up and I can say with full confidence you will not be disappointed. I read a decent amount of concern in reviews about the low input overhead.

I haven't found that to be a problem at all. In fact I have no idea where people come up with these claims.

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It's about the size of two longish bricks stacked one atop the other, a form factor roughly used by a few other well known mono-preamps or DIs.

Database design for mere mortals 3rd torrent There is also a ground lift switch. Actually the info is in their gmail archive. Having had it beside a Great River pre-amp for a good while, I would use the just as often as the Great River, which is considerably more expensive. Remember Me? SM7B or RE20?
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Universal audio solo 610 sound on sound torrent If you decide to use an iLok dongle, both V1 and V2 are compatible with our products. It sings, i'm really diggin this sound. Fun because there are so many different sounds to be had with this unit. Rupert Neve Designs Portico Blessings, Marc.
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Being tube based and not having huge headroom, you can push the the input gain and hear it start to fatten up the sound as it begins to have some subtle distortion, first on peaks and then more and more. There is a clipping light that blinks yellow when clipping is getting close and red when you are into clipping, but that's not always a bad thing with this type of tube-based pre-amp.

Below the knobs are a set of simple single throw switches. The impedence switch is nominally for switching between mics vs. There is also a ground lift switch. On the front is also a DI input and a passthrough output. The input to the DI is passed right back out to the output, and is typically used to feed both an DI'd signal and an amp signal simultaneously.

In the Studio The gets a lot of flack around these parts, because of it's supposedly untenably low input overhead, and in some cases because they are contemptuous of the claim that it is the same as the console pre-amps of yore. But I don't find either concern to be a problem. Of course I'm not a metal screamer, or using it to mic snare drums either not that that might be a bad thing given the nice crunchy distortion that might provide.

I've never run into a situation where it's required anything more than reaching over and bringing down the input gain knob a bit. And of course in some worst case scenario you could use an inline pad. Those who think that the whole point of digital is to be super-clean and crispy obviously wouldn't like this pre-amp, since it's anything but. Though it can get clean to the point that you wouldn't particularly notice it relative to a plethora of other pre-amps by cranking the input down and the output up , it can also get quite thick with noticeable harmonic enhancement from the tubes starting to break up.

If you are a tube maven of course you could play with various tube replacements to see if you find something you like better. The one I have came with some vintage NOS tubes already in it. As a bass DI the rocks definitely, though maybe not for super-bright moh-dern type of recording. But for anything from Jazz though country through rock it's a great bass DI, and sounds kind of nice push to the edge of a little breakup. I use it with a Jazz. It also makes a very nice DI for hardware analog synths though you have to be careful of the levels since the synth will put out a line level signal.

You can always use a re-amp box to bring the signal down appropriately if necessary. I don't use amp sims myself anymore, but I did back some years ago and it was a very nice way to get a nice guitar signal into the box to apply to a sim. On vocals be sure to play with the gain structure to get a fatter or thinner sound depending on the characteristics of the singer. For me, keeping it cleaner works better on vocals, but your mileage may vary.

Summary I find the to be an excellent pre-amp for my particular needs, which leans towards more vintagey type material. Though it's a marketing cliche theses days, it really is a good way to offset the overly clean digital capture mechanism and get some old school harmonic distortion into the box on the way in, not faking it later. Having had it beside a Great River pre-amp for a good while, I would use the just as often as the Great River, which is considerably more expensive.

Given the quite reasonable price for the , compared to most pro level mono pre-amps out there, it has significant bang for the buck. I have had the Solo since mid and I can emphatically say it is a fun pre to use. Fun because there are so many different sounds to be had with this unit. The effect of the impedance switch is way cool, allowing a choice between low and high impedance for either the mic or DI input, with different impedance range for each.

For mic input, the impedance choice is ohm or 2K ohm, and for DI the choice is 47k ohm or 2. I have found that it is always worth trying the high and low setting for any mic you use with the I have found lots of variation in sound by using this switch alone. It seems to match up well with lots of mics.

I recently conducted a shootout of mic-pre combos for male vocals, and the Solo was chosen as the best pre matchup for 4 out of the 7 vocal mics in the shootout. It also shines on bass DI, and I love it as a mic pre for acoustic bass. The specs say it only has 60 db max gain on the mic input at ohms, but I record a lot of quiet sources and have never been disappointed in its gain, even with ribbon or dynamic mics.

In fact it seems to have as much or more gain than several of my preamps rated at 70 db. It drives my SM7b just fine with Gain at 5 and Level at 8. FYI, UA recommends powering up the Solo about minutes before operation so that the tubes and transformers are at proper operating temperature.

This unit is well-built and has been an extremely reliable performer. This is my go to pre for anything harsh that needs to be softened. I find that this preamp handles shrill signals in a very pleasing way,making them much more usuable and not as ear piercing. It is useful on thin sounding vocals and harsh guitars. It does work well as an outside or sub kick preamp.

The Solo is notable for its abundance of features compared to other preamps. In addition to Direct Inject input, you also have selectable impedance, and a two stage gain section for tonal control, as well as the usual pad, phase invert controls. I used the Solo on a lot of sources with good luck, notably bass, acoustic guitar, and electric guitar. I preferred the Solo for vocals most of the time with condenser microphones, but I did like the with dynamic vocal mics such as the Shure SM7B.

This preamp seems tailor made for bass guitar, whether DI or miked up, it's warm and fat. I also like the way it softens an acoustic guitar track. You can get some really classy vintage sounds out of this box, and in my world, that's a delight. The variable impedance was very useful to me for tuning the tone of dynamic microphones, many of which seemed to love the "low Z" setting.

I tried different tubes and found them to provide subtle shadings of difference, and ended up with a JAN GE in the first position for a slightly cleaner tone, although the stock JJ 12AX7 sounded excellent. The Darth Vader appearance of the unit is something to love, and it seems built to last. I only occasionally ran into headroom issues, usually when trying vocals. I like listening back to my recordings made with this preamp, the sounds are warm and inviting. A perfect preamp for those looking to upgrade or expand from a basic setup, or for those getting started looking for a useful single channel.

The Solo is a perfect partner, if you can find one. I think the trick to get this thing not to clip on highly dynamic sources is to crank the first gain knob, and not the second level knob. Try to get as much gain as you can from the first knob, when and if you encounter clipping. This discontinued preamp and DI unit from Univeral Audio was the solid-state brother-sister to the Solo , a tube unit.

Like the Solo this one also has a Direct Inject input, a variable input impedance, and a two stage gain section for tonal shaping. The Solo is modeled on the "vintage" setting of the larger and discontinued too rack preamp units that also had a clean mode and a soft limited mode. The sound is clear and bright but not harsh, and with a sort of friendly analog warmth that's variable based on how much gain you dial in on the first control, that I found especially flattering to electric guitar, acoustic guitar and vocals, although, I would expect this preamp to be very suitable to any number of sources had I seen the opportunity to expand its use.

I would attribute this sound quality to the design, but also to the use of a transformer on the input, which has been a hallmark trait of many of the beloved classic preamp circuits of the past. I find transformer balanced preamps to be more musical for most sources, for my aesthetic. I liked the softly shaded clarity this brought to my productions. Between this, the thicker sounding , and a four channel utility preamp Sytek I felt like I could get anything done and produced a lot of really excellent recordings with a pleasing sound stage.

These were my first high-end preamp channels and open my eyes to the possibilities of recording with world-class equipment. They were miles above any all-in-one preamp-converter-interface box I had ever used and set a benchmark for the quality I have come to demand. The low-Z setting really brought to life a lot of dynamic microphones, and I used it often.

The DI sounded really nice on electric guitar, but I would use the more often for bass guitar. I felt that the Solo series offered a great value, and performed excellently in my DAW based setup, providing a classic sound. I appreciated the single channel form factor as it allowed me to purchase one channel at a time on a realistic budget. The Solo is well built and seems equipped for any recording task, so I would recommend one highly should you encounter this specimen on the used market.

These are interesting preamps. They kind of flew under the radar of the "tube" series, and made one think they might lose out if they didn't get the tube version. But using this I accidentally got my favorite take I ever tracked. I was recording a band live, with vocals to be dubbed later. I just wanted to make sure everyone could hear the guy. He was sitting away from the band, looking towards them mic aimed away from the band.

I hit record and they played through the track pretty darn good. On playback the drums just came to life like harmonic explosions, with a giant room sound. My compressor works But as I started mixing I could notice a certain indescribable quality to that one Track. It made me want to listen to it, and get lost in it. Undoubtedly it was the preamp, the solo There were lots of other factors, but what I liked the most was the transient "shsh" kinda sound, sort of distorted, yet not noticbly so.

The band loved it and they decided not to do overdubs. The unit feels like a tank, the controls feel like something a pro would design You can tell its not a bunch of cheap parts. And I'd say skip the tube and get the , if you can find one. Great Pre! I used it on every Bass track on my last album. It really does create a big and warm tone.

I also used this on the Kik in my drum tracking. I must say it didnt give me quite the bite i wanted. Warm and Big. This is really an amazing deal for that great tube sound. It's built like a tank and feels like it looks. The only reason i would give it a 9, in sound and in features, rather than a 10 is that some of the controls are in the back which makes it difficult to switch around, and with the Warm Big tone, it sometimes creates unwanted mudd in a mix.

But for the money, i'd recommend this to anyone looking for a tube pre. Needless to say - when I started the mission of building a home studio - I knew I was tackling getting into the digital world, and building my proficiency with PT. Through all that though - I knew that the main course I wanted to plot in building the studio was to have as much analog character as possible with pre's and mikes to try to set the "warmth bar" as high as possible in my recordings.

Both units share exactly the same rugged steel chassis and have identical features and facilities, but the internal electronics are obviously completely different. The chassis measures x x mm WxHxD , with a strap handle on the top, and the top and sides extend beyond the chassis frame to protect the switches on the front and back panels.

The sides have stylish cooling slots cut in the shape of the UA logo. The solid-state Solo weighs 2. In keeping with its vintage styling, the features a pair of metal toggle switches associated with the output XLR, which provide a ground lift and adjust the output level between mic and line settings. The Solo has identical facilities but uses illuminated blue push buttons.

The Solo 's IEC inlet includes a fuse-holder-cum-voltage-selector catering for or V operation, while the model has a switched-mode power supply that can accommodate any mains voltage from 90 to V. Both units consume a maximum of 18W of power.

Moving around to the front panel, both units have identical facilities, but the controls them with metal toggle switches and large, vintage-style knobs, while the uses the same illuminated blue push buttons and modern knobs as are found on the and units. In both cases, the left-hand knob controls the input gain, while the right-hand knob sets the output level, and both are scaled arbitrarily from 0 to The first of the five switches selects between the rear-panel mic input and front-panel DI input, while the second configures the input for high or low impedance.

Next is a phantom power switch, followed by a Hz high-pass filter switch and, finally, an output polarity reverse switch. The LED shows green when the signal is at a nominal signal level, turns amber as the headroom limit is approached and the amount of distortion increases, and turns red when the amplifier clips.

The front-panel DI input is joined by a parallel-wired 'thru' output both are on quarter-inch jacks allowing the preamp to take a 'sniff' of a guitar signal en route to the guitar amp, for example. The DI input is about 20dB less sensitive than the mic input, which is pretty much ideal. The switchable input impedance affects both mic and DI inputs. The high-impedance mode could be considered the default condition, being ideally suited for 90 percent of circumstances, but the lower value provides an alternative flavour that may prove useful.

As might be expected, the all-valve Solo has a lower maximum gain than the solid-state Solo , the figures being 60dB and 77dB respectively. These figures are both with the low-impedance mode selected — the gain drops a few dB in high-impedance mode — and the maximum gain is roughly 20dB less when the DI input is selected, as already mentioned.

At the expensive end of the market, the single-channel preamp format is not a particularly popular one — at least not without EQ and dynamics thrown in. The Avalon is an impressive all-discrete Class-A solid-state preamp, while the SPL is a hybrid, incorporating a switchable tube stage to add that special thermionic character when required.

Both are excellent preamps in their own right, with the M5 leaning more towards the neutral and transparent end of the range, and the Gain Station being a little more colourful when required, but still capable of very faithful reproduction when appropriate. The Solo is a pretty faithful recreation of the original preamp design, also found in the Universal Audio LA and The Solo uses the same dual-triode 12AX7 and valves — the former to handle the input, and the latter to drive the output — and the output transformer is also the same as that used in the I believe the input transformer is slightly different, though, to suit the revised input circuitry.

WIMA capacitors are used throughout alongside conventional components set out neatly on a relatively spacious circuit board, roughly half of which is given over to the linear power supply with a generously sized mains transformer. There are only two ICs in the whole box — one is a voltage regulator in the power supply and the other drives the signal level LED.

The audio signal only passes through the two valves and two transformers — the way Putnam intended! Unlike its peers, the Solo has a single, continuous Gain control instead of the rotary 5dB stepped switch of the original and its subsequent recreations, and there is no line input facility or 15dB pad to accommodate high-level sources. The characteristic aspect of the circuit design is that to increase the input gain, the amount of negative feedback around the input 12AX7 valve is reduced.

This inevitably results in an increase in harmonic distortion, which affords the user the ability to juggle the Gain and Level controls to optimise both signal level and sound quality. Crank the input gain up for a slightly crunchier sound, back it off for a cleaner sound, and adjust the Level control to provide the appropriate peak levels at the output. It's simple, elegant and surprisingly versatile. By comparison, the internal layout of the Solo seems ultra-modern and complex.

Most of the passive components are surface-mounted with just a few conventional WIMA capacitors thrown in where it matters. The power supply is a compact switched-mode module, with additional regulation and filtering on the main board — the whole lot taking up about a quarter of the internal real estate.

The same input transformer is used as the Solo , but there is no output transformer. The Precision series is famed for its superb dynamics and clarity, while still retaining something of the warmth that characterises the vintage Putnam designs. The Precision and preamps feature a switch labelled 'Shape' which is absent from the Solo

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Universal Audio Solo 610 (Electric Guitar)

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